Image: Park campus

 The University of Gloucestershire is playing host to a public seminar looking at the history of medical research and the advances made in medicine following public participation.

Published: 27/04/2016 16:04

The University of Gloucestershire is playing host to a public seminar looking at the history of medical research and the advances made in medicine following public participation. Organised by Research4Gloucestershire (a joint initiative between the university and the Gloucestershire health community), ‘What’s research ever done for us?’ will take place at the Park campus, Cheltenham, on 18 May from 6pm.

The seminar will see several speakers discussing topics such as the first comparative clinical trial in 1747, the use of trials to change radiotherapy treatment methods and the imitation of nature to detect and treat disease.

Diane Crone, Professor of Exercise Science at the University of Gloucestershire and co-organiser of the seminar, said: “This public lecture will celebrate why research is important to improve all of our lives. It's an opportunity to find out how research is actually used in health services to make a difference to the treatment we all receive when we visit the doctor or go to hospital. There will be some great examples of how local people involved as research participants have made a difference to the lives of others by volunteering to take part. We hope that people will come and enjoy finding out about how research can make us all healthier and live longer!”

Dr Julie Hapeshi, Deputy Director of the Gloucestershire Research Support Service and co-organiser of the seminar, said: “Advances in healthcare seldom happen by accident -they require the hard work of the researchers who plan and conduct the studies and the willingness of the patients who take part in them. This event celebrates their hard work and commitment and will hopefully inspire people to consider research as an option for their clinical care or to ask their doctor if there is a study for them to take part in. It is OK to ask about research!”

Everybody is invited to attend the event – tickets are free but booking is required.